Browse Locations

9397 locations found. Showing locations 1 to 50

  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The Middletown Air Depot at Olmstead was the official location of the Air Force base. It then closed in 1969, and then became the Harrisburg International Airport (HIA). The facility is named in honor... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The Bank of Huntington was established along with the development of the railroad in Huntington, WV, and was originally located on the eastern side of what is now Downtown Huntington.Larger banks were... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    Bascom Lamar Lunsford was an attorney and a folklorist who became the leading performer and promoter of traditional Appalachian folk music during the early 20th century. Lunsford was born near this ma... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The monument, which memorializes the soldiers who died in the Battle of Carthage in 1861, was completed August 16, 1905. Located in the south west corner of the cemetery, the monument was erected by t... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Construction of the Fort Totten Officers' Club began in the 1870s although the building was not completed until 1887 owing to the creation of additional floors. After its construction, the fort served... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    This local history museum is located in the Darbeck-Bergheim House and offers a collection of materials related to Boulder history that began in the early 1940s. At that time, the local newspaper bega... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    The Chicago Children’s Museum includes 3 floors of exhibits and activities that provide children and families highly interactive exhibits, sensory experiences, and education. The exhibits and program... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The New Asylum for Orphan and Friendless Colored Children, also known as the Colored Orphan Asylum, was founded in 1844 “to provide an Asylum for the protection, care, and education of destitute orpha... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The CMC-Northeast Stadium, formerly known as Fieldcrest Cannon Stadium, is a 4,700-seat stadium that is home to the Kannapolis Intimidators-a class Low-A affiliate of the Chicago White Sox. The team h... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Training Center Cape May is the only U.S. Coast Guard recruit Training Center for Basic Military Training still operational today. Training Center Cape May prepares U.S. Coast Guards recruits to carry... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Hotel magnate Conrad Hilton purchased the Mobley Hotel in 1919 and rented rooms to traveling oil field workers. Preserved and restored by the Hilton estate, the building now serves as the headquarters... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    This historic stone mansion was built in 1741 by influential Dutch merchant Cornelius Low. The home is operated by the Middlesex County Museum and offers free tours of the home and its historic furnis... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The Dam Tender’s House (or Richards House) was built in 1816. It is one of the oldest homes in Perry Township and one of the oldest limestone structures still standing in Ohio. After being sold to the... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Dennis Neill founded Tulsa Oklahomans for Human Rights in the 1980s. The organization opened the first LGBT community center in the state, despite a string of hostile landlords and those who feared th... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Denver Union Station is transportation hub and the main railway station in Denver, Colorado. On June 1, 1881, the station opened and the structure you see today wasn't completed until 1914. At its hei... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    The handsome three-story Main Building of what was the once Western Carolina Male Academy established in 1852, is now the Eastern Cabarrus Historic Museum and provides a glimpse of mid-1800 to early-1... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Eden's Sons Civil War Memorial DRAFT - Submitted for Review
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Erected in 1897 the Eden's Sons Civil War Memorial would be dedicated to the all the Maine regiments who served in the Union during 1861-1865. The memorial shows all four regiments that participated i... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Richmond's First African Baptist Church traces its roots back to 1780 when enslaved people attended services with their owners. In 1841, white members of the First Baptist Church sold the original chu... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The First African Methodist Episcopal (FAME) Church is the oldest, and one of the largest African American congregations in Los Angeles, California. Bridget (Biddy) Mason founded the church in 1872. A... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Residing in Forsyth Park of Savannah, Georgia is a Confederate monument with a soldier “facing his enemies” in the North. The cornerstone of the monument was dedicated in 1874 and the monument was ded... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Confederate soldiers and enslaved laborers constructed Fort Clark and Fort Hatteras at the start of the Civil War to protect Hatteras Inlet, a key strategic route for shipping. Recognizing the importa... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Fort Condé is a replica of the original French Fort Condé, built in 1720. The fort would also be known as Fort Carlota under Spanish rule, and Fort Charlotte under British and American rule. Visitors... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Sequoia National Park has three visitor centers and King's Canyon has two. Giant Forest Museum is located in the Giant Forest sequoia grove in Sequoia National Park. The museum features exhibits about... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    This recently-opened history and natural history museum features three floors of gallery space that share the human and natural history of Indiana. The museum also hosts cultural exhibits and events,... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Island in the Sky Visitor Center of Canyonlands National Park is located near thetown of Moab and offers a small exhibit related to the history of the park and its ecosystem. The park was added to th... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The Johnson County Poor Farm site is important to Iowa’s history, telling the story of the county’s care for it’s citizens from the earliest days until today. The county’s first facility is the asylum... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    This beautiful Italianate-style house was built in 1880 by its namesakes Leverett and Amanda Clapp. It is one of the few Italianate houses in Centreville and as such is one of the more unique houses i... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Built in 1927, the Malonga Casquelourd Center for the Arts has become a popular performing-arts complex in the city of Oakland. Formerly known as the Alice Arts Center, it is a beautifully restored tu... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    "Lincoln Park is the largest Capitol Hill Park and features monuments to two of the nation's greatest leaders, President Abraham Lincoln and Civil Rights Activist and Educator Mary McLeod Bethune... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The Mike Mansfield Federal Building and United States Courthouse is a historic building located in Butte, Montana. Built in 1904 and designed by architect James Knox Taylor in the Renaissance Revival... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    This statue located near Gate 12 at Kentucky Commonwealth Stadium (Kroger Field) commemorates Nate Northington, Greg Page, Wilbur Hackett, and Houston Hogg, the first African Americans to play footbal... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Byrd Leibhart archaeological site is located within Native Lands Park and while it is no longer a current dig site, archaeologists have unearthed many artifacts and discovered burial sites from a Susq... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    This small local history museum and archive is located in the civic building, and it also serves as the headquarters of the Oceanside Historical Society. Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    The Oregon Jewish Museum and Center for Holocaust Education (OJMCHE) is located at 1953 NW Kearney St in Portland, Oregon. It was founded in 1989 as a "museum without walls" and has grown to what it i... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Constructed in 1937 under the leadership of Mason and community leader John Wesley Dobbs, this building was home to one of the most important secular organizations in Atlanta's black community. Dobbs... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Constructed between 1912 and 1929, this factory building served as the headquarters of printing giant R.R. Donnelley & Sons. At this location, the company designed and produced materials for numerous... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Construction of the Merchant's Exchange building began in 1904. This fifteen-story structure was one of the only structures to survive the 1906 earthquake and subsequent fire that destroyed over twent... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Dating back to the purchase of land by former slaves who built a church on this land, this historic African American Cemetery is one of the oldest black cemeteries in the state of Mississippi. The old... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Designed by architect John Holden Greene and completed in 1809, this Georgian mansion appears much as it did in the early republic. The home was built for Sullivan Door, an important business leader a... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    This educational building was built in 1929 following a large growth in the congregation of the First Baptist Church. The building was designed by Rueben Harrison Hunt, a prominent Chattanooga archite... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Vinland Estate is a Romanesque Revival "summer cottage" on the Cliff Walk. This Gilded Age house was completed in 1884 by the architecture firm Peabody & Stearns for wealthy tobacco heiress Catharine... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The Vista Avenue Viaduct crosses over a historic ravine, Tanner Creek, through which the MAX Light Rail now runs. The bridge was built in 1926 to connect the King's Hill and Vista Ridge areas of Portl... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Nathan Goff Jr. hired architect Harrison Albright to design the Waldo Hotel in 1901, and when the Waldo opened in 1904 it was one of the most luxurious hotels in West Virginia. The Waldo Hotel was nam... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Welcome to Jacksonville! This mural you’re looking at was created by one of the Walldog Muralists by the name of Cameron Bortz that arrived here all the way from Pawcatuck, Connecticut to Jacksonville... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Named for William Venoid Banks, the founder of WGPR-TV, this broadcast center and museum shares the history of the first television station owned and operated entirely by African Americans. Banks hope... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The John F. Kennedy Memorial recognizes the place where the young Senator announced his intention to enter the West Virginia primary as a Democratic Presidential candidate in 1960. Winning the West Vi... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    This mosaic created by local children and artist Debora Palmer depicts a variety of downtown scenes. It is located along the Caperton Trail restroom building, in between the amphitheater in Hazel Ruby... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    This effigy mound does not look like an "Alligator" per say, In theory its name may come from a Native American tale about an "under-water" panther, or at least of a dangerous under water creature. Th... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    "Bloody Monday" Riot Site DRAFT - Submitted for Review
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    On August 6th 1855, members of the anti-immigrant American Party (more commonly referred to as the "Know Nothings") attacked Catholic Irish and German Immigrants. Prior to the violence, armed "Know No... Learn More
  • Thumbnail
    Time Capsule-Historic Images and Recollections
    The Danville Municipal building in Virginia was the scene of one of the most violent attacks by a police department against civil rights protesters during the 1960s. The Danville sit-ins began in 1960... Learn More

ResponsiveVoice used under Non-Commercial License