Browse Locations

664 locations found. Showing locations 1 to 50

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    G and G Veterinary Hospital DRAFT - Submitted for Review
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    A well established animal hospital which helped livestock in the area of Sedalia MO. Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The Rappahannock Tribe Cultural Center opened shortly before the tribe elected G. Anne Nelson Richardson its first female chief since the 1700s. As chief, Richardson works to revitalize her community... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The home was built in 1925 as the residence of Miami Springs founder Glenn H. Curtiss's half-brother and business partner G. Carl Adams. The two-story home is constructed in the Pueblo Revival style f... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    G. L. Hulbert opened the second largest country store in Buffalo in September 1941. The self made business man had outgrown his little country store and made the decision to expand to a 30,000 square... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Bloomington's Soldiers of All Wars Memorial Marker was funded by the local chapter of the Grand Army of the Republic--a fraternal order created by Union veterans after the Civil War--and dedicated in... Learn More
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    G.I. P.O.W. M.I.A. and K.I.A Memorial DRAFT - Submitted for Review
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    This monument serves to honor those who have serve, died, or gone missing in action. The monument resides in front of the Putnam county courthouse. This began in 1971 by a MIA wife who pushed for furt... Learn More
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    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    Located in a former Greyhound bus station, the George Washington Carver Interpretive Museum's mission is to educate all visitors about the contributions African Americans have made throughout the coun... Learn More
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    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    Take a walk through Nebraska history! Located in a beautiful Richardsonian Romanesque mansion, the G.W. Frank Museum is part house museum, part history museum, part cultural center. Built in 1890, the... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The Gabreil Daveis Tavern House was built in 1756 and served as an integral Gloucester Township community focal point for over a decade. It also served as a field hospital during the Revolutionary Wa... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    A marker on Route 301 just north of Richmond, VA in Henrico County marks the spot of Gabriel's Rebellion. A doomed slave rebellion that was one of the largest and most far-reaching ever conceived. In... Learn More
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    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    Built approximately in 1785 by John Gadsby, this tavern played a part of the lives of our founding fathers. Founding fathers such as Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and George Washington are recorded as... Learn More
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    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    The Gadsden Museum of Art, located directly adjacent to the Mary G. Hardin Center for Cultural Arts, was founded in 1963. It officially opened in 1965. Its mission is to inform, inspire, and educate t... Learn More
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    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    The Gaines County Museum seeks to reflect the peoples and cultures who have inhabited the Gaines County area from the indigenous past to the present. Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The University of Missouri is the source and site of the infamous Gasines V. Canada case. In this court battle the 14th amendment was put up against states rights and the existence of segregation. Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    This decisive Civil War battle took place on June 27, 1862 and was the largest of what has come to be known as the Seven Days Battles. Both sides suffered a high number of casualties and the Confeder... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The establishment and growth of Gainesville is partly due to the introduction of the Florida Railroad, which opened up the interior of Florida for both settlement and trade. Connecting the Atlantic an... Learn More
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    Gainesway Farm DRAFT - Submitted for Review
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    What is now known as Gainesway Farm was first purchased in April of 1774. The farm is known for a thoroughbred horse that bred Stone Street, Derby winner of 1908. Today, Gainesway boasts several champ... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    A National Historic Landmark, Gaineswood is one of the finest Greek Revival (Neoclassical) mansions in the country. It was built and designed by cotton planter Nathan Bryan Whitfield between 1843-1860... Learn More
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    On the grounds of the Gaithersburg Latitude Observatory stands a plaque that reads: “This small framed structure played a key role in the scientific investigation of the Earth's rotation. In... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Walnut Grove and surrounding communities had large and growing Asian American populations. Following a 1921 law mandating segregation of Asian American children, Isleton, Courtland, Walnut Grove, and... Learn More
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    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    The museum contains mineral specimens and mining equipment central to the region's historical economy, as well as mining-related paintings by a local artist. Behind the museum are exhibits of military... Learn More
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    Galewski House DRAFT - Submitted for Review
    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Resource No. 164, Railroad Vernacular built in 1904 for Alexander Galewski, saloonkeeper and long-time city resident. Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Built in 1888 as a St. Louis Flat building style, commercial entities occupied the lower floor while residential apartments existed on the upper floor. The Raba family proved to be its longest residen... Learn More
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    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    Established in 1977, the Gallatin Historical Society operate this local history museum and research library in a former jail that was built in 1911. The museum includes permanent exhibits on Native Am... Learn More
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    Museums, Galleries and Archives
    The Gallery of African Art is a vibrant institution that celebrates the music and art of African and the African diaspora. Its art collection features masks, tools, textiles, religious icons, househol... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Established in 1987, the Gallia County Convention and Visitors Bureau offers resources and personal assistance for visitors to the area. The office offers several visitors guides and the website also... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Though no longer used for its original purpose as city hall, Gallier Hall still plays a prominent role in New Orleans civic and social life. It was built between 1845-1853 and designed by Irishman Jam... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The Gallier House provides one of the best examples of classic New Orleans history and architecture. Located in the French Quarter, the house is bordered by many other historical landmarks, like the B... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    When the first French settlers came to Gallipolis, they arrived at what is now the city park along the Ohio River. Today, the park hosts events from food festivals to live performances. Every year aro... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    “The Spirit of the American Doughboy” statue was erected in the Gallipolis City Park in 1931. The statue was paid for by the local Women’s Auxiliary post to honor World War I veterans from Gallia Coun... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Built in 1846, the Galloway House is a historic home located in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. It is part of a historical site called the Galloway House and Village, which is operated by the Fond du Lac Hist... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    During the Salem witch trials of 1692, Gallows Hill was the site of the hangings of nineteen convicted witches. The exact site and hill of the hangings is still not precisely known, and the likely are... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    After a devastating and disastrous hurricane in 1900, the state of Texas and city of Galveston joined together to construct one of the greatest forms of civil engineering. Great engineers built a wall... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Galveston was the most important Texas seaport for the Confederacy during the Civil War, and it also became one of the most important Southern ports after the Union Navy captured and blockaded nearly... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Situated at the eastern terminus of Canal Street in heart of downtown New Orleans, the Gálvez Monument commemorates Bernardo de Gálvez, who served as the Territorial Governor of Louisiana between 1777... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    This former plantation once belonged to Robert Gamble, a soldier who served in the second Seminole War (1835-1842; there were three in total, lasting from 1817-1858). He was rewarded 160 acres for his... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Sitting on 132 acres of land, the Gamsjager-Wysong farm house was built in St. Clara, West Virginia in 1906. The land, originally owned by Joseph H. Diss Debar, the settler of St. Clara and also the c... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    A National Historic Landmark, Ganondagan State Historic Site is the location of the largest and fully interpreted and developed Seneca Indian village of the 17th century. The word ganondagan means "to... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Known formally as the Memorial Building, the GAR Memorial Hall is a historic building located in downtown Topeka near the State Capitol. Although the building currently houses the State of Kansas Offi... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The Garcia School is a historic school building in Wickenburg, Arizona, and is considered to be the best surviving example of a brick one-room schoolhouse remaining in the state. Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Dry Tortugas National Park is about 68 miles west of Key West and is in the Gulf of Mexico. This park is home to the seven Dry Tortugas islands and Fort Jefferson, a large unfinished fortress. The isl... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Garden of the Gods is a red rock formation. It was created during a geological upheaval along a natural fault line millions of years ago. Archaeological evidence shows that prehistoric people visited... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Once covered by one enormous inland sea, stretching across Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, rivers poured sediment and sand into the place that is now called Garden of the Gods. The weight of water an... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The park’s name is anything but generic: it is actually named after the Garden family, one of the earliest families in Warwood. David Garden came to the region from Scotland in 1816 and built his farm... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The current Gardner Mill was a replacement of an earlier one, and included Federal architecture styling. It is the only surviving mill in Utah that is documented to be one of Gardner's works. Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Opened in 1876 and currently covering 128 acres, Garfield Park is Indianapolis’ oldest and largest city park. The park was designed by famed landscape architect, George Kessler, and is part of his la... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    The Garland Farm was the last home of Beatrix Farrand (1872-1959), one of the country's best landscape architects of the first half of the 20th century. The historic property consists of the main hous... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Garland Hall at The University of Alabama houses the Department of Art History and the Sarah Moody Gallery of Art. It was named after the University of Alabama's third president, Landon Garland, who s... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Garnet, Montana: Once a booming town full of miners and their families, now an uninhabited plot of land with a couple dozen empty cabins and stores.Garnet is named after the Garnet Mountains that prov... Learn More
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    Historic Sites, Monuments, Landmarks, and Public Art
    Named for former slave Henry Highland Garnet (1815- 1882), Garnet High School served as one of three black high schools in Kanawha County, WV. As most schools did, Garnet High School provided a vital... Learn More

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