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According to pikelincoln.com:

Built circa 1841 -1846

Zachariah Nairn Garbutt was born in New York in 1814. He studied law in Washington, D. C. Later he moved west settling in Jacksonville, Illinois where he continued the reading of law. In May of 1839 he received his license. In that same year he came to Pike County, Illinois.

Being strong Whig Party supporter he and others started the Free Press newspaper in 1846. Sometime in 1848 Garbutt advertised that he needed an intelligent boy between 14 – 17 years of age who could read and write for the position of printers devil.

Joel Pennington proprietor of the Mansion House Hotel in Pittsfield knew young John George Nicolay from when he lived in Greene County, Illinois. Pennington may have sent word to Nicolay about the job resulting in Nicolay walking to Pittsfield where he spent the night on sacks of wool at the Carding Mill. The next morning he applied for the position at the Free Press.

Mr. and Mrs Garbutt took a liking to John Nicolay treating him like a son. He was always welcome in their home. By 1849 Garbutt retired from the Free Press. In 1853 Nicolay was voted a partner in the ownership. One year later he became the sole proprietor and editor of the paper.


Building, Plant, Property, Window

According to pikelincoln.com:

Built circa 1841 -1846

Zachariah Nairn Garbutt was born in New York in 1814. He studied law in Washington, D. C. Later he moved west settling in Jacksonville, Illinois where he continued the reading of law. In May of 1839 he received his license. In that same year he came to Pike County, Illinois.

Being strong Whig Party supporter he and others started the Free Press newspaper in 1846. Sometime in 1848 Garbutt advertised that he needed an intelligent boy between 14 – 17 years of age who could read and write for the position of printers devil.

Joel Pennington proprietor of the Mansion House Hotel in Pittsfield knew young John George Nicolay from when he lived in Greene County, Illinois. Pennington may have sent word to Nicolay about the job resulting in Nicolay walking to Pittsfield where he spent the night on sacks of wool at the Carding Mill. The next morning he applied for the position at the Free Press.

Mr. and Mrs Garbutt took a liking to John Nicolay treating him like a son. He was always welcome in their home. By 1849 Garbutt retired from the Free Press. In 1853 Nicolay was voted a partner in the ownership. One year later he became the sole proprietor and editor of the paper.

https://www.pikelincoln.com/talking-houses/zachariah-n-garbutt-house/